deaf ambition

ELA ORLEANS, “TUMULT IN CLOUDS” Video by movies for ears
Born in Poland, artisically raised in Glasgow and now based in Brooklyn, Ela Orleans has always crafted eclectic lo-fi pop representative of her many pins on the world map that’s shrouded in a dark sense of the Iron Curtian territory she grew up in. On the title track off her 2012 album Tumult In Clouds on Clan Destine, the lyrics are based on a poem by W.B. Yeats called “An Irish Airman Foresees His Death”. As you might assume, it’s a bit of a morbid piece and the new video for the track isn’t far off, but for a girl who grew up in Auschwitz, it’s likely not an all too uncommon theme.
The clip is a collection of oddly uncomfortable, propaganda-like, black-and-white aerial wartime footage that combines with the the sharp tension of Orlean’s violins to create a vivid sense of the fate the Irish Airman foretold in Yeats’s prose. While the source of the film and Ela’s relationship to the poem are a mystery, there’s no doubt watching the video you’re affected with a sense impending doom that’s pushed even further by the distancing inclusion of subtitles. Anyone else have goosebumps?
Click Here To Watch…

ELA ORLEANS, “TUMULT IN CLOUDS” Video by movies for ears

Born in Poland, artisically raised in Glasgow and now based in Brooklyn, Ela Orleans has always crafted eclectic lo-fi pop representative of her many pins on the world map that’s shrouded in a dark sense of the Iron Curtian territory she grew up in. On the title track off her 2012 album Tumult In Clouds on Clan Destine, the lyrics are based on a poem by W.B. Yeats called “An Irish Airman Foresees His Death”. As you might assume, it’s a bit of a morbid piece and the new video for the track isn’t far off, but for a girl who grew up in Auschwitz, it’s likely not an all too uncommon theme.

The clip is a collection of oddly uncomfortable, propaganda-like, black-and-white aerial wartime footage that combines with the the sharp tension of Orlean’s violins to create a vivid sense of the fate the Irish Airman foretold in Yeats’s prose. While the source of the film and Ela’s relationship to the poem are a mystery, there’s no doubt watching the video you’re affected with a sense impending doom that’s pushed even further by the distancing inclusion of subtitles. Anyone else have goosebumps?

Click Here To Watch…

  1. deafambition posted this